Botulinum toxin type A shows promise to reduce neuropathic pain

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One of the difficult aspects of living with a spinal cord injury is dealing with the neuropathic pain that can occur. Finding effective ways to manage this type of pain can often be complicated. A study that was recently published in Annals of Neurology shows that a new treatment option might be promising.

The study, which was supported by Medytox, tested a theory that subcutaneous injections of botulinum toxin type A could help to control neuropathic pain in patients with a spinal cord injury. The study injected 200 units of BTX-A beneath the skin of 40 patients who were suffering from neuropathic pain.

As part of the study, assessments for quality of life and pain were completed before the treatment was given. This was followed up at four weeks and eight weeks after the treatment with the same assessments. Overall, the patients reported 55 percent pain relief of at least 20 percent at the four week mark and 45 percent pain relief of at least 20 percent at the eight week mark.

The results from the group who received the botulinum toxin type A injections was a marked improvement over the placebo group. Overall, only 15 percent of the placebo group reported similar pain relief at four weeks. Only 10 percent of the placebo group reported similar pain relief at eight weeks.

Pain management is one aspect of care after a spinal cord injury that can make the difference between having a good quality of life or its far more challenging opposite. This is also an expensive aspect of treatment. For those who suffered a spinal cord injury in Ohio because someone else was negligent, seeking compensation might make it easier to afford the care necessary to live after the injury.

Source: Neurology Advisor, “Botox May Reduce Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury,” Feb. 09, 2016

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